Sweet Facts about Acesulfame Potassium

Sweet Facts about Acesulfame Potassium

Expert Opinions

Expert Opinions on Acesulfame Potassium

Over 90 scientific studies have thoroughly established the safety of Acesulfame Potassium, a non-caloric sweetener. In addition, some of the world's leading scientific institutions and regulatory bodies have reviewed these studies and have confirmed the product's safety. In fact the National Toxicology Program, a U.S. federally-funded institution program, completed their own confirmatory study of the ingredient’s safety.

The following are statements from regulatory bodies regarding the safety of Acesulfame Potassium:

  • “Under the conditions of this 9-month study, there was no evidence of carcinogenic activity(from) Acesulfame Potassium in male or female p53 haploin sufficient mice exposed to 0.3%, 1%, or 3%.”

    (National Toxicology Program Board of Scientific Counselor’s Technical Reports Review Subcommittee on May 22, 2003)
  • “FDA has evaluated the data in the petition, published scientific literature, and other relevant material from its files and concludes that the use of ACK in non-alcoholic beverages is safe”

    (Food and Drug Administration in the Federal Register Vol.63, No. 128, Monday, July 6, 1998, page 36,361)
  • “FDA has evaluated the data in the petition and other relevant material and concludes that the use of Acesulfame Potassium in alcoholic beverages is safe”.

    (Food and Drug Administration, Federal Register Vol. 60, No. 85, May 3, 1995, page 21,701)
  • “FDA has evaluated the data in the petition and other relevant material and concludes that the proposed use of Acesulfame Potassium in yogurt and yogurt-type products, frozen and refrigerated desserts, and in syrups, sweet sauces and toppings is safe….”

    (Food and Drug Administration, Federal Register Vol. 59, No. 230, December 1, 1994, page 61,540)
  • “FDA has evaluated the data in the petition and other relevant material and concludes that the proposed uses of Acesulfame Potassium in baked goods, baking mixes, and frostings, icings, toppings, and fillings for baked goods are safe….”

    (Food and Drug Administration, Federal Register Vol. 59, No. 230, December 1, 1994, page 615,424)
  • “…the agency…concludes that Acesulfame Potassium is safe for the additional uses requested…”

    (Food and Drug Administration, Federal Register Vol. 57, No. 236, December 8, 1994, page 57,961)
  • “FDA has evaluated the data in the petition and other relevant material and concludes that Acesulfame Potassium is safe under the conditions of use ...”

    (Food and Drug Administration, Federal Register Vol. 53, No. 145, July 28, 1988, page 28,382)
  • "The committee was provided with extensive toxicological data including metabolic, long‑term, reproduction and teratology studies. The long‑term studies in rat and mouse did not show any dose‑related increase in specific tumors nor any treatment‑related pathological changes of significance."

    (Commission of the European Communities, "Sweeteners." Reports of the Scientific Committee for Foods No. 16, Luxembourg, 1985)
  • „The safety of acesulfame K is well documented by the studies reviewed by the SCF (EU Scientific Committee on Food), JECFA (Joint Expert Committee for Food Additives of the WHO and FAO) and national authorities: A re-evaluation is not recommended as the compound was recently reviewed by the SCF.”

    (Food Additives in Europe 2000 – Status of Safety Assessments of Food Additives Presently Permitted in the EU, Nordic Council of Ministers, Tema Nord 2002:56)
  • "More than 90 safety studies, including four long‑term animal feeding studies, conducted over the last 20 years were submitted to the FDA.  FDA addressed the question of tumors found in some rats fed acesulfame K during one of the long‑term studies. A detailed analysis of the tumors showed that they were typical of what could be routinely expected in rats and were not related to acesulfame K."

    (American Dietetic Association, "Position of The American Dietetic Association: Use of nutritive and non-nutritive sweeteners," ADA Reports)
  • "Currently, there are three non-nutritive sweeteners...approved for use in the United States: saccharin, aspartame, and Acesulfame Potassium - - These products undergo rigorous scrutiny from the FDA and are not allowed on the market unless they are safe for the public, including people with diabetes, to consume.''

    (Technical Review, Vol. 17, Number 5, May 1994, Diabetes Care) (Note: there are currently five non-nutritive sweeteners approved for use in the United States – Acesulfame Potassium, aspartame, neotame, sucralose and saccharin.)